Ann Huppert

Ann Huppert

Associate Professor

Ann C. Huppert offers classes on architectural history, focusing particularly on urbanism, drawing and the architecture and art of the Renaissance. Recent courses have included the Drawing and the Design Professions, (Re)Building Rome 1400-1800, Architecture of Mediterranean Cities, 1300-1600, Drawing and Artistic Process in the Italian Renaissance (Department of Art History), and Italian Renaissance Art (Department of Art History). She also teaches survey courses including Architecture of the Ancient World, Medieval and Renaissance Architecture, and Appreciation of Architecture I. Professor Huppert received an B.A. in Philosophy from Vassar College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Architectural History from the University of Virginia. Before joining the faculty at the University of Washington, she taught in the architecture and art history departments at the University of Kansas, the Ohio State University and Syracuse University. She has been a fellow at Worcester College in Oxford and at the Bibliotheca Hertziana in Rome, and has received additional fellowships from the American Philosophical Society and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. Professor Huppert's book, Becoming an Architect in Renaissance Italy: Art, Science, and the Career of Baldassarre Peruzzi, (Yale University Press, 2015) investigates the close connections between the figural arts and architecture in the early sixteenth century through the lens of a remarkably large group of period drawings. Among the topics the book explores are the close connection of Peruzzi’s mathematical aptitude with his skill in perspective, and the influence of antiquity on his designs. Other publications have examined the role of perspectival drawings in the building workshop and designs for new St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican, in the Journal of Architectural Historians, and Renaissance practices of mapping ancient Rome, in Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome. Recently published book chapters include “Practical Mathematics in the Drawings of Baldassarre Peruzzi and Antonio da Sangallo the Younger,” “Giorgio Vasari and the Art of Siena,” and “Material Matters: Training the Renaissance Architect.” She has presented her research at numerous academic conferences in the United States and in Europe.